10 New Personal Finance Books to Bring to the Beach in 2019

While everyone else is downloading the Kindle edition of the latest steamy romance novel as they prepare to pack up and head to the beach, you’re curating your beach reads more carefully.

You’re looking to use your time soaking up those rays productively, learning more about personal finance and how to better your money. That way, you can get to the beach again faster.

We’ve got you covered on your quest. Here are ten of the best personal finance beach reads for 2019.

Tiller is giving away this entire list of 10 book to three Tiller Money Memo subscribers on May 29 2019. Enter to win by signing up here.

General Personal Finance Books for 2019

Get Money by Kristin Wong

If you’re clueless about money, you’re not alone. You probably never had to take a class on your credit score, building an emergency fund or simply how not to live paycheck-to-paycheck.

To combat the generational knowledge gap, author Kristin Wong—a millennial herself—penned Get Money to help bring her peers up to speed.

Anything but dry and boring, Wong makes personal finance lessons come to life with beanie baby analogies and a type of gamification that allows you to “play” at personal finance.

You might not “get” money now, but you will when you set down this book.

End Financial Stress Now by Emily Guy

Okay, so maybe you “get” money, but you still find yourself making all the wrong moves. You’re not saving for retirement. Your emergency fund’s a joke. And you cannot seem to control your impulse spending.

What to do? Pick up a copy of Emily Guy Birkin’s End Financial Stress Now. In its pages, Birkin looks at the reasons we do all the stupid money things, and presents research-backed life hacks that will help you better modify your fiscal behavior.

Student Loan Solution by David Carlson

You likely know David Carlson from his book Hustle Away Debt or his personal finance blog Young Adult Money. In his latest work, Student Loan Solution, Carlson covers the dreaded money monster hanging over a large portion of the millennial population: student loan debt.

Student loans and their associated repayment programs are incredibly complex, as evidenced by the paltry number of student borrowers who successfully claimed the first round of Public Student Loan Forgiveness since 2017. Carlson expertly breaks them down in a way you can understand, and helps you create a plan to get your life and debt straight again.

Investing Books for 2019

Broke Millennial Takes on Investing by Erin Lowry

Hot off the press, Erin Lowry’s second tome takes a deep dive into a place most millennials are hesitant to dip their toes into: Investing.

Tackling this millennial anxiety head-on, Broke Millennial Takes on Investing
uses smart money advice mixed with age-appropriate anecdotes and cultural references to teach this group of adults how to take charge of their own future wealth.

Learn about robo advisors, investing while paying off student loans, socially responsible investing and more in this new release.

How to Invest in Real Estate by Joshua Dorkin and Brandon Turner

Some books on real estate investing take you through the theoretical. Not this one. How to Invest in Real Estate by Joshua Dorkin and Brandon Turner not only gives you actionable knowledge to get your real estate empire started, but also encourages you to actually get started on it today.

Each section is broken up into manageable chunks rich with insights you’ll need along your investing journey.

Authors Joshua Dorkin and Brandon Turner know what they’re talking about. Dorkin founded the largest online real estate investing community—BiggerPockets—and together with Turner created the #1 real estate show of the same name. Both are active real estate investors to this day.

Financial Independence books for 2019

The Art of Being a PITA by author Shanah Bell

In this refreshing look at personal finance, author Shanah Bell takes a deep dive into financial security outside the traditional workplace. An entrepreneur and mother in a blended family, Bell proves that financial security is something that can—and maybe actually should—be approached with an outside-the-box approach.

If you want to live life on your own terms, The Art of Being a PITA is the book for you. Bell gives you permission to break the mold and offers a unique way to build financial freedom outside of a corporate lifestyle.

Retire Early with Real Estate by Chad Carson

Investing in real estate as a beginner is one thing, but if you’re ready to take your skills to the next level, download Chad Caron’s Retire Early with Real Estate. Carson, who retired at age 37, shares his step-by-step process in this book, along with helpful tips and insights seldom discussed in larger investing circles.

A man after my own heart, Carson acknowledges that real estate isn’t the sure-thing investment we were brought up to think it was. This is an incredibly important feature in any post-recession real estate literature. Because of this fact, Carson includes unique backup plans to give you a little extra padding should anything happen to your local market.

Invested by Danielle Town

Invested is described as a blend of Rich Dad, Poor Dad and The Happiness Project. Danielle Town (co-host of the popular InvestED podcast) shares her yearlong journey learning to invest, as taught to her by her father, investor and bestselling author Phil Town.

The book shows how to take command of your life and finances by choosing companies with missions that match your values, using the same gold standard strategies that have catapulted Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger to the top of the Forbes 400.

Avoiding complex math and obsolete financial models, she turns her father’s investing knowledge into twelve easy-to understand lessons.

Women’s Personal Finance Books

Women with Money by Jean Chatzky

This new release by Jean Chatzky also discusses money mindset and messaging, but then goes on to focus on teaching readers how to use their money to build joy in their life.

Readers can do this by learning to build a business, invest, getting the pay bump they deserve, saving for tomorrow, and leveraging their wealth to build secure relationships and raise financially secure and confident children.

Women with Money is also one of the few books which acknowledges the financial realities you face when you’re a caregiver—a role most women will take on at one point in their life or another as they care for children or aging family members.

Smartly taking on the complexities that confront women and their finances, it’s a book you’ll be able to come back to over multiple life stages.

The Feminist Financial Handbook by Brynne Conroy

Written by yours truly, The Feminist Financial Handbook is an attempt to bring intersectional feminism to the forefront of our money conversations.

Featuring the money stories, struggles and triumphs of sixteen diverse women, this book covers everything from poverty to raising children, from pursuing true wealth and contentment to learning more about investing, and from money in the Rainbow and disability communities to finances through divorce.

Called “revolutionary” and “a unicorn among finance books,” The Feminist Financial Handbook offers a fresh perspective on personal finances. If you want to learn hacks that will help you better your money even and especially if you’re not already rich, be sure to download this one before you head off on vacation.

Enjoy those rays!

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